Coastal hazard risks arise when marine and coastal processes have the potential to negatively affect environmental, social, cultural or economic values.

Climate change is projected to increase certain types of hazard risks to the marine and coastal environment. Our report examines these risks and how we can improve resilience in the face of change.

Considering climate change risks in land use planning

Coordinated planning that considers climate risks can mitigate current and future impacts on communities. This includes land-use planning that considers the impacts of sea-level rise, including more frequent inundation and erosion.

The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) analysed how Victorian councils were considering climate change in land-use planning. A strong pattern was seen when comparing inland and coastal councils. Coastal councils were three times more likely to have an intermediate, high or advanced consideration. In 2018, 30 percent of coastal councils were assessed as having no or basic integration of climate change into land-use planning.

Point Nepean National Park
Image credit - Parks Victoria

Catchment Management Authorities

Victoria is divided into ten catchment and land protection regions. Catchment Management Authorities (CMAs) plan and coordinate land, water and biodiversity management in each of these regions. All ten CMAs across Victoria are implementing Climate Change Adaptation Plans or Strategies. These were developed using CSIRO's latest climate change projections and in conjunction with key Australian research organisations.

 

Coastal blue carbon ecosystems

Blue carbon is the carbon stored in coastal and marine ecosystems. including mangroves, tidal marshes and seagrasses. Caring for these ecosystems offers opportunities for carbon sequestration and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. It can also enhance fisheries and increase resilience of coasts to rising sea levels and storm surges.  Research published in 2019 found that allowing coastal wetlands in Victoria to naturally retreat with sea-level rise could capture and store 1.6 million tonnes of carbon by 2050 with a value of $65 million.

Theme: Managing Coastal Hazard Risks
2021 Indicator: 52 Considering climate change risks in land-use planning
LOCATION
STATUS
TREND
DATA

Statewide

STATUS

Fair

TREND

Unclear

DATA

Moderate

Data source: DELWP

2021 Indicator: 53 Climate change adaptation plans
LOCATION
STATUS
TREND
DATA

Statewide

STATUS

Fair

TREND

Improving

DATA

Low

Data source: Catchment Management Authorities

2021 Indicator: 54 Nature-based adaptation
LOCATION
STATUS
TREND
DATA

Statewide

STATUS

Poor

TREND

Unclear

DATA

Moderate

Data source: DELWP

2021 Indicator: 55 Emergency planning and preparedness
LOCATION
STATUS
TREND
DATA

Statewide

STATUS

Good

TREND

Improving

DATA

Moderate

Data source: Emergency Management Victoria